What I’m Into: October 2016

fall

pumpkins

geese

spielgaben

When I look at these photos, I realize what a blessed month we had.

I still struggle with anxiety, especially concerning Felix’s complicated health and his and developmental delays and the infinite appointments that come with them; but when I take a moment to reflect on the beautiful moments, I have to admit I’ve been unspeakably blessed.

It’s still such a treat to be able to take him out into the world and expose him to all the things he missed during his first 18 months. We’ve had gorgeous weather and are surrounded by such wonderful people. It’s been divine. And I’m still working through therapy.

Anyway, here are a few things I’ve enjoyed this month.

Audiobooks

audiobook - ready player one

YOU GUUUUUUUUUUUYS. I JUST DISCOVERED AUDIOBOOKS. And it has changed my life.

(Audiobooks were always out of my reach because I didn’t have a device on which to play them. My smartphone was super-old and didn’t have space for apps. But when Lydia smashed it, I had to upgrade. Since then I’ve been maniacally downloading ALL THE APPS, including Overdrive. So now I can borrow audiobooks from the library FOR FREE. And now I can read books WHILE GETTING WORK DONE. It’s . . . it’s miraculous, you guys. I haven’t been able to read fiction for the last five years because I can’t simultaneously take care of my children. I want to cry, I’m so happy.)

Ready Player One by Ernest Cline; read by Wil Wheaton.

This is the first audiobook I tried. Modern Mrs. Darcy had recommended it. It was so awesome, you guys. The story is a ton of fun and Wil Wheaton does a spectacular job reading it. I don’t know a thing about video games or 80’s pop culture so most of the references were lost on me, but I was hooked by the charming characters and thrilling plot, set in a fascinating dystopian future. I took my dang phone with me everywhere I went for two solid days until it was done. It was a blast. And it has a happy, hopeful ending. (P.S. I laughed out loud when the protagonist/narrator makes a reference to Wil Wheaton as an “old geezer” and the future president of the OASIS. The irony was too good.)

Dad is Fat by Jim Gaffigan.

We’re big Gaffigan fans around here, so I jumped at the chance to hear him read his first book. It’s laugh-out-loud funny, and I enjoyed hearing about his life with five kids in New York City. You can tell he adores his children but of course they drive him crazy. I found his essays relatable, amusing, and even inspiring. He’s a good guy.

Still Life: Chief Inspector Gamache Book 1 by Louise Penny; Read by Adam Sims. Gah! I’ve always been a fan of the murder mystery genre. The first book in this series is everything I could have hoped for. A brilliant, lovable detective; deep musings on what it means to be human; a charming but vibrant community; and a thrilling mystery. The plot was exciting and well-paced. And the reader was phenomenal. I can’t wait to read book 2.

Children’s Read-Aloud Chapter Books

Since our libraries have been closed for the last four months, I gave in and bought some kids’ books at the bookstore. I was fortunate to hit on a couple of winners:

children's book - bfg and pippi longstocking

The BFG by Roald Dahl. Lydia’s a hard sell when it comes to chapter books unless they feature fairies or princesses, but I managed to lure her into this classic by watching the trailer for the movie. (Which looks pretty sweet, by the way. I can’t wait to watch it.) Anyway, she ended up loving it, just as I did as a kid. She was amused by the Big Friendly Giant’s silly, bumbling language; she got a kick out of the slapstick humour (the giants fighting in their sleep slew her); and she loved to talk about frobscottle and whizzpopping — a.k.a. farting — with anyone who would listen. It’s an exciting story (though a bit scary — children get eaten) with some complex characters and lots of impressive imagery.

Pippi Longstocking by Astrid Lindgren. This fun collection of stories about a crazy girl who lives without parents and is strong enough to pick up grown men was an immediate success with my five-year-old. She laughed out loud at many of Pippi’s antics. I love that the girl is brave, goofy, confident, and totally herself. I honestly appreciated a story wherein a child tries school and decides it’s not for her. (School is always presented in books as this wonderful learning environment and I worry Lydia will think she’s missing out.)

Children’s Picture Books

Bones: Skeletons and How They Work by Steve Jenkins. Lydia’s been really into skeletons lately, so I knew this one would be a bit hit. Steve Jenkins makes beautiful books, we always love them. It features some life-sized bones, lots of different animal skulls, and tons of interesting facts about bones. She was delighted by the fold-out pages depicting the life-sized 200 ribs of a python. When we closed back cover the first time, she breathed out, “That was a really good book.”

Movies and Television

Since our children both sleep so little and are so disruptive when awake, we haven’t had a chance to watch much in the last year.

We gave the 1984 film Splash a try. I saw it listed on a “Top 20 Rom-Coms of All Time” kind of list and it stars Tom Hanks.  It was recently added to Netflix in Canada. I thought Lydia might enjoy the mermaid element. I expected it to be silly and fun.

It was completely stupid on every possible level.  Oh my gosh. Did people not have brains in the 80s? I feel embarrassed just thinking about it. A total waste of our time.

That’s what I’ve been into! How about you? Any audiobook recommendations?

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Comments

  1. The girls love Noisy Village by Astrid Lingren and Cobble Street Cousins by Cynthia Rylant. There is also an audiobook of the Velveteen Rabbit narrated by Meryl Streep…so good! I’m pretty boring in my audiobook choices because I can’t multitask so I pretty much only listen on road trips along with the girls.
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  2. These moments are too precious,cherish it. These can be your best gift ever to yourself!

  3. Astrid Lindgren have written so many fantastic books. Her name, her picture and her stories are all among the most recognized in Sweden, and since a few years you can even find her and Pippi on banknotes!

    My favourite book of hers is that of Ronia the Robbers Daughter. It is a medieval fantasy about a girl brought up as the only child in a robbers nest, daughter to the chief himself. It features her exploring the fantastic forest scenery with all its creatures, interacting with the cursing unwashed robbers, and, most importantly, her getting to know the son of a rivalling robber, and how this affects the relation she has with her father. I know several people, myself included, who have reread it several times for themselves as adults with great pleasure.

    For most of the novel, Ronia is about 11 years old, and it might be better appreciated by a child a little older than your daughter. But what do I know? :)

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