Felix is Two!

Last week we celebrated Felix’s second birthday.

It was a short, sweet and quiet celebration, just at home as a family. But it offered some time to reflect on how far he’s come in the last year.

I felt bittersweet about the arrival of his birthday. Now that he’s two, it feels more glaring that he’s so behind in his development — he still can’t walk, can’t talk, and has disordered eating because of all those months of tube-feeding. We’ve recently learned that he can’t really hear, either, so we are working towards getting him hearing aids with the hopes that we will see progress with his speech.

But goodness, we’ve come a long way. Last year he was still in strict isolation and was still hooked up to continuous IV. He had a central line in his chest and was still on strong oral medications. He couldn’t sit up on his own or crawl. He had never been kissed, had never had a bath. He had never seen the outdoors beyond our back yard, had never seen another child.

In the past few months he has gone everywhere with us: to the park, the mall, the beach, to friends’ houses. He has weekly days out with both grandma and oma. He splashes in the bathtub for almost an hour every day, just delighting in being surrounded by water. He’s chewed on sticks and gotten his hands dirty in the mud. He gets smothered in kisses constantly, by his adoring big sister and mama.birthday kisses

Felix continues to be an absolute, complete and utter delight. He’s the snuggliest little snuggle bug you ever did meet. He loves to explore new places and new toys (even if he does it all on hands and knees). He loves being tickled, and will pull our hands to his face to get more tickles when we stop. And did I mention he loves the water? Bath tubs, swimming pools, the lake, you name it.

We are unspeakably blessed to have him in our family. His life is a miracle and we are in constant awe of that.

I just want to thank you all again for supporting us through prayer, friendship, and financial support over the last two years. We will never stop feeling grateful.

What I’m Into: October 2016

fall

pumpkins

geese

spielgaben

When I look at these photos, I realize what a blessed month we had.

I still struggle with anxiety, especially concerning Felix’s complicated health and his and developmental delays and the infinite appointments that come with them; but when I take a moment to reflect on the beautiful moments, I have to admit I’ve been unspeakably blessed.

It’s still such a treat to be able to take him out into the world and expose him to all the things he missed during his first 18 months. We’ve had gorgeous weather and are surrounded by such wonderful people. It’s been divine. And I’m still working through therapy.

Anyway, here are a few things I’ve enjoyed this month.

Audiobooks

audiobook - ready player one

YOU GUUUUUUUUUUUYS. I JUST DISCOVERED AUDIOBOOKS. And it has changed my life.

(Audiobooks were always out of my reach because I didn’t have a device on which to play them. My smartphone was super-old and didn’t have space for apps. But when Lydia smashed it, I had to upgrade. Since then I’ve been maniacally downloading ALL THE APPS, including Overdrive. So now I can borrow audiobooks from the library FOR FREE. And now I can read books WHILE GETTING WORK DONE. It’s . . . it’s miraculous, you guys. I haven’t been able to read fiction for the last five years because I can’t simultaneously take care of my children. I want to cry, I’m so happy.)

Ready Player One by Ernest Cline; read by Wil Wheaton.

This is the first audiobook I tried. Modern Mrs. Darcy had recommended it. It was so awesome, you guys. The story is a ton of fun and Wil Wheaton does a spectacular job reading it. I don’t know a thing about video games or 80’s pop culture so most of the references were lost on me, but I was hooked by the charming characters and thrilling plot, set in a fascinating dystopian future. I took my dang phone with me everywhere I went for two solid days until it was done. It was a blast. And it has a happy, hopeful ending. (P.S. I laughed out loud when the protagonist/narrator makes a reference to Wil Wheaton as an “old geezer” and the future president of the OASIS. The irony was too good.)

Dad is Fat by Jim Gaffigan.

We’re big Gaffigan fans around here, so I jumped at the chance to hear him read his first book. It’s laugh-out-loud funny, and I enjoyed hearing about his life with five kids in New York City. You can tell he adores his children but of course they drive him crazy. I found his essays relatable, amusing, and even inspiring. He’s a good guy.

Still Life: Chief Inspector Gamache Book 1 by Louise Penny; Read by Adam Sims. Gah! I’ve always been a fan of the murder mystery genre. The first book in this series is everything I could have hoped for. A brilliant, lovable detective; deep musings on what it means to be human; a charming but vibrant community; and a thrilling mystery. The plot was exciting and well-paced. And the reader was phenomenal. I can’t wait to read book 2.

Children’s Read-Aloud Chapter Books

Since our libraries have been closed for the last four months, I gave in and bought some kids’ books at the bookstore. I was fortunate to hit on a couple of winners:

children's book - bfg and pippi longstocking

The BFG by Roald Dahl. Lydia’s a hard sell when it comes to chapter books unless they feature fairies or princesses, but I managed to lure her into this classic by watching the trailer for the movie. (Which looks pretty sweet, by the way. I can’t wait to watch it.) Anyway, she ended up loving it, just as I did as a kid. She was amused by the Big Friendly Giant’s silly, bumbling language; she got a kick out of the slapstick humour (the giants fighting in their sleep slew her); and she loved to talk about frobscottle and whizzpopping — a.k.a. farting — with anyone who would listen. It’s an exciting story (though a bit scary — children get eaten) with some complex characters and lots of impressive imagery.

Pippi Longstocking by Astrid Lindgren. This fun collection of stories about a crazy girl who lives without parents and is strong enough to pick up grown men was an immediate success with my five-year-old. She laughed out loud at many of Pippi’s antics. I love that the girl is brave, goofy, confident, and totally herself. I honestly appreciated a story wherein a child tries school and decides it’s not for her. (School is always presented in books as this wonderful learning environment and I worry Lydia will think she’s missing out.)

Children’s Picture Books

Bones: Skeletons and How They Work by Steve Jenkins. Lydia’s been really into skeletons lately, so I knew this one would be a bit hit. Steve Jenkins makes beautiful books, we always love them. It features some life-sized bones, lots of different animal skulls, and tons of interesting facts about bones. She was delighted by the fold-out pages depicting the life-sized 200 ribs of a python. When we closed back cover the first time, she breathed out, “That was a really good book.”

Movies and Television

Since our children both sleep so little and are so disruptive when awake, we haven’t had a chance to watch much in the last year.

We gave the 1984 film Splash a try. I saw it listed on a “Top 20 Rom-Coms of All Time” kind of list and it stars Tom Hanks.  It was recently added to Netflix in Canada. I thought Lydia might enjoy the mermaid element. I expected it to be silly and fun.

It was completely stupid on every possible level.  Oh my gosh. Did people not have brains in the 80s? I feel embarrassed just thinking about it. A total waste of our time.

That’s what I’ve been into! How about you? Any audiobook recommendations?

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What I’m Into, Podcast Edition (Fall 2016)

my favourite podcastsImage credit

Do you enjoy podcasts? Until recently I didn’t really even know what they were or why I’d want to listen to them. I didn’t even know where to find them. (Hint: you can listen to them on iTunes, straight from your laptop if you have one.)

With a very talkative 5-year-old homeschooler always around, quiet time is a premium in our home.  Why would I want to hear more talking? But somehow I stumbled upon Katy Bowman’s podcast on Nutritious Movement a few months ago and was completely smitten. I could learn stuff while folding laundry and kneading bread? It wasn’t long before I’d discovered the magic of podcasts.

Because there is hardly a moment in my life that’s not already filled up with spoken words, I’m very particular about the podcasts I listen to. I quickly get impatient with podcasts that feature women chit-chatting about their lives and things they like. I have enough chit-chat in my life. I want to learn things. Like a big old nerd. All right?

Here are a couple I’ve come to love.

Magic Lessons with Elizabeth Gilbert.

I went completely gaga for Gilbert’s recent book, Big Magic, a few months ago. (See my review here.) Her podcast is every bit as inspiring. In each show, she talks to a regular human being who is struggling with a creative project, whether that’s in dance, poetry, writing, comedy, etc. Then she talks to a successful artist in the same field for ideas and inspiration. Finally, she goes back to the original person a few months later to see how they’re doing. The combined wisdom of Gilbert and her co-conspiring expert never fail to fill me with encouragement and a sense of awe and excitement about being human.

Shalom in the City with Osheta Moore.

If you want to make the world a better place, you have got to listen to Osheta’s podcast.

Osheta is one of the best sort of people. She is genuinely passionate about reconciliation between individuals and communities, and she is humble, patient, and generous. Now, I’ve been following Osheta’s blog for a few years now. She’s a great blogger, but she is a phenomenal podcast host. She is a natural. She was made for podcasting. She has such a warm, loving voice. She asks insightful questions. She makes me want to be a better person.

In each episode, she talks with a “shalom sista” — a woman she feels is working to bring shalom to a broken world in her own unique way. Every woman she has interviewed has been inspiring, knowledgeable, and wise. They have talked about issues like human trafficking, living in a neurodiverse community, and caring for the environment. I come away from each podcast feeling encouraged and inspired.

Katy Says with Katy Bowman.

Katy Bowman is the biomechanist who has been rocking my world for a while now (and, as I mentioned above, was my gateway to podcasts). She’s the author of the Nutritious Movement blog, as well as the books Whole Body Barefoot and Move Your DNA, which I looooooved. In fact, I recently wrote this about her work:

Bowman is majestically articulate and engaging, able to explain complex and foreign concepts in easy-to-understand terms. She’s funny and memorable, too. And her ideas are revolutionary and exciting. Some of the most interesting highlights for me have been:

-the difference between exercise and movement (and how we need more of the latter in our lives)

-the difference between fitness and health (“fit” people can be just as susceptible to illness and injury as anyone)

-her radical suggestion that you don’t have to add exercise to your busy schedule. Just change the ways you move in your everyday life to become stronger, more capable and less prone to injury. In a word, healthier.

Katy Bowman is the reason I spent this last weekend walking barefoot in the woods carrying my toddler in my arms (instead of, say, on my back.) I still have so far to go, but I am constantly being inspired to move more and move better.

The Robcast with Rob Bell.

I used to be a big fan of Rob Bell’s — when he was the pastor at Mars Hill and was constantly putting out popular books and videos — until he kind of just disappeared, and I forgot about him. Just recently I discovered he’s been podcasting for quite some time.

I think he’s better than ever. He interviews the most amazing people and has such invigorating conversations. Some of my favourites have included Richard Rohr, Pete Rollins, and Elizabeth Gilbert. These folks make me fall in love with God all over again. I appreciate Rob’s easy, relaxed style, too. And there are no frills in his podcasts. No ads, no sponsors, not even any intro music to suck up my valuable time. He just launches in with his signature, “Hi, friends!” I love it.

Yesterladies with Heather and Dayna.

I might be a little biased because the hosts of this podcast are two close friends of mine. But I deeply enjoy learning about different women from history, from the most successful pirate of all time (who happened to be female) to Canada’s beloved L.M. Montgomery. I particularly enjoyed the history of the bikini. Who knew it was such an explosive history? It’s a fun, easy, lighthearted way to brush up on my history from two wildly intelligent and articulate women while I cook dinner. It never ceases to make me a little prouder to be a woman.

What are some of your favourite podcasts?? Please share!

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