Happy Life Day, Felix!

This weekend we celebrated the one-year anniversary of Felix’s transplant — often known in the transplant community as his “Life Day.”

One year ago, this happened:

gene therapy - transplantAnd now a year later, here he is! Completely out of isolation. He is a happy, healthy little boy.

We celebrated with a big old shindig in my parents’ back yard, complete with bouncy castle. We tried to invite as many local friends as we could who’d helped support us through Felix’s awful first year, about 80 guests (wishing we could invite more!).

Our son, who was supposed to die, is alive and well!

It was a perfect day, too — sunny and warm, but not hot, with just a wisp of a breeze.

Here’s a quick photo dump for you:

tent(Friends made that awesome banner)

tea lydia

 

boucy castle

Felix bouncy castle

Happy Life Day

I think he liked the balloons.

balloonsballoons2We feel so incredibly blessed.

Thank you, God, for letting us keep our boy.

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What I’m Into: June 2016

laundry

Happy Canada Day, friends!

I have never been more grateful to be a Canadian. I am overwhelmed with gratitude for the way my government and community cared for us during Felix’s hospitalization. And while I watch in horror as xenophobia and hatred grip so many other parts of the world, I am so comforted that my home country has continued to be a welcoming place for immigrants from all over the world.

(And I kind of love that our biggest political scandal of the year was when our Prime Minister accidentally elbowed a woman in the House of Commons, and he spent the next week apologizing profusely at every opportunity. #soCanadian)

We live in an amazing country. I am so, so fortunate.

Anyway, June has been pretty okay. The warm weather and long days fill my heart with joy. Felix’s health continues to be good, but we continue to deal with some sleeping, eating, and developmental issues which exert constant stress on my mama heart.

asleep(Asleep in his favourite place)

Also: Ben and I are a twelve days into a Whole30. We both have a couple of minor healthy issues we would like to improve upon, and we thought it was worth giving it a try. I’m really impressed Ben has been able to hold up. It hasn’t been a big deal. It’s just a ton of work, keeping on top of all those vegetables.

Anyway, here’s what I’ve been into!

Books

whole 30 cookbooksAm I allowed to talk about cookbooks? These two have been my constant companions over the last two weeks as I’ve been preparing and cooking for our Whole30.

Melissa and Dallas Hartwig’s cookbook is indispensable for the program — it’s full of tips and ideas for getting through the Whole30, plus it’s loaded with simple, delicious, customizable recipes. Lots of pictures, too.

Nom Nom Paleo has been great, too. It’s a beautiful book all around. Lots of mouthwatering recipes accompanied by full-page photos, and the cartoons add a charming touch. Tam’s writing style is fun and entertaining, and really inspires you to get in the kitchen. But the recipes are time-consuming. I feel like cooking this way has to be a full-time job.

booksBefore starting the Whole30, I also read the Hartwigs’ first book on the subject, It Starts with Food. This book explains the reasoning behind the Whole30 in a really accessible way. I read a new book on food and nutrition nearly every month, and I still managed to learn quite a bit from this one.

How to Talk So Kids Will Listen & Listen So Kids Will Talk by Adele Faber and Elaine Mazlish. This is a wonderfully practical book on how to talk with children in a respectful way that encourages two-way communication. I am delighted with the new tools and inspiration I’ve gained to engage with my children better and build a stronger relationship. And I actually really appreciated the cheesy cartoons that help illustrate what this kind of conversation looks like. Highly recommend.

Children’s Books

children's books

I was thrilled to find three smart, fun books that everyone enjoyed and that were (for a change of pace) completely gender-neutral. No glittery princesses here!

Press Here – Herve Tullet. This fun, interactive book got lots of play. Over and over again, Lydia delighted in following the instructions on the pages to make the dots do different things (knowing full well that it was all in fun). It was neat to see her so thoroughly enjoy engaging with painted dots on a plain white page.

The Book with No Pictures by B. J. Novak. I’m not exaggerating: this book is a work of genius. Lydia howls with laughter when I read it. (And I’m not a particularly comical reader.) Not only is the premise brilliant — this book makes the grown-up reading it say ridiculous things against her will — but Novak knows his audience amazingly well: he knows just the right words to make little people giggle. “Blueberry pizza,” “Boo Boo Butt” and “BADOONGY-FACE” crack Lydia up every time. The varied fonts and colours of the text subtly direct the reader how to deliver the lines.  I haven’t heard of a kid who wasn’t tickled by this book.

The Day the Crayons Quit by Drew Daywalt. When I first showed Lydia the cover of this book she announced, “I’m not interested in that.” I told her we’d give it a try. After reading it once she declared, “This is my favourite book!” and requested a re-read the following two nights.

Each of Duncan’s crayons gets a full page to express its frustrations about how it is used. Gray complains that he gets tired colouring such huge animals like elephants and hippos. Pink complains that it never gets used at all except by Duncan’s little sister. It’s full of personality and charm. And Duncan’s final drawing is a delightful work of art.

apple-pip princessApple-Pip Princess by Jane Ray. I still can’t pass up a good princess when I find one, knowing Lydia will love it.  This lovely, original fairy tale features three sisters who are instructed to demonstrate their skills so their father, the king, can decide which is most fit to be the next ruler. The youngest, unsurprisingly, makes the greatest impression through her selflessness and dedication to her community and the environment. The illustrations are opulent, the story is lively and well-paced, and I love seeing women of colour represented as competent, interesting, complex humans who are perfectly suited to rule the land. Five stars.

Movies

Of course we went and saw Finding Dory opening weekend (with Lydia). By now you probably know me well enough to know I love just about everything Disney/Pixar puts out. Finding Dory was no exception. Full of laughs and nonsense, it was also heart-wrenching at times. It was a visual wonder, and Ellen Degeneres voiced the lovable fish brilliantly. Also, young Dory is the most adorable thing to come out of the Pixar lab since Boo from Monsters Inc.

Ben and I watched Edge of Tomorrow on Netflix and let me tell you, it was neat. I love a smart action sci-fi movie, and I was riveted to the end.

We also watched The Martian, which was a thrilling, heartwarming, feel-good flick we both enjoyed thoroughly.

All right, that’s about it for now! Hope you’re having a lovely summer!

Linking up with Leigh Kramer.

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2 Keys to Keeping Your Young Child’s Art Supplies From Taking Over Your House

2 tips for keeping your toddler's art supplies from taking over the house

My Lydia is an artist.

It was apparent from the start. She knew all her colours names before she was two. From the day she figured out she could make marks on paper she has been producing artwork like it’s her job. Sheets and sheets of paper, every single day.

drawing

The girl loves to draw. And paint. And sculpt. And colour.

But like many artists — especially those under four feet tall — she’s messy. She’s careless.

It used to drive me insane to find all her markers and their caps scattered all over the floor every day. I’d pick them up and return their caps — making sure the colours matched, tossing the ones that had dried out — just to turn around and find they were all over the floor again.

Crayons, markers, coloured pencils, pens, paintbrushes, printer paper, construction paper, ALL OVER THE PLACE, ALL THE TIME.

Finally, I decided to make some changes.

Here are my two main tips for keeping your toddler’s and preschooler’s art supplies under control.

1. Strictly limit colour options.

marker holder made with plaster of paris. Keep markers off the floor and capped!Kids three and under don’t need that many colours. They don’t need the four different shades of purple that come in many packs of markers or crayons. (Why always so many shades of purple??)

For kids aged 2-3, I find that limiting colours to the primary and secondary colours (i.e. the six colours of the rainbow), plus black and brown, is sufficient. That’s 8 colours total.

Add pink and grey if you want to be generous and you’ve got an even 10.

One of each. No duplicates.

When you limit the number of crayons that are available, I believe you give yourself and your child a certain amount of freedom. Neither of you will feel overwhelmed by the prospect of tidying up the art supplies after a vigorous art session.

You can look at your kid’s whole stash and go, “Hmm . . . where’s the blue?” And then go hunt for that one crayon. It’s very satisfying to know you’ve got every single one.

It can help encourage your child take responsibility for her supplies, too. She won’t want to lose track of her only blue crayon, because how will she draw Elsa without it??

drawing 2

Does it sound like I’m being anal, rationing out colours like a miserly crayon fairy? I don’t care. It feels great to be able to keep track of every single crayon in the house. And she never complained.

Note: when Lydia turned four, I found that she was interested in exploring different shades and hues, and she had become much more responsible with her art supplies. At that point I increased the number of colours available to her so she had at least one light and one dark shade of each colour, making a grand total of 12-15.

(Now that she’s almost five she has access to almost 20).

2. Have an exact place for every item.

As you can see from the marker holder at the top of this post and the crayon roll here, I made a system so that every item had its place and could be accounted for.

The plaster marker holder is a brilliant idea I got from Jean Van’t Hul of the Artful Parent (detailed DIY instructions come from her book of the same name). The lids are embedded in the holder and therefore can’t get scattered on the floor. It really encourages kids to put their markers right back where they belong. It also reduces the number of items you have to pick up by half.

Same with the simple felt pencil crayon holder. I would tell Lydia her pencil crayons all had to go to sleep for night in their own bed. (Of course she tried to bunk several pencils together at once but you do what you can.) When you notice one “bed” is empty, you know you have to hunt down one single crayon somewhere, and you can quickly narrow down which one it is.

When it came to wax crayons, I was delighted that my very favourite ones — Melissa and Doug’s jumbo triangular crayons — come in a beautiful, high-quality container with divided compartments for each of the crayons.

crayons

So there you go. With these two tips you can reduce the chaos that comes with raising a little artist.

Now go make some art!